EDITION OF THE GREEK TEXTS 

Tobit  – Edition of the Greek Texts
Book of Tobit

The present translations have been based on the critical edition of Robert Hanhart (Septuaginta: Vetus Testamentum Graecum Auctoritate Academiae Scientiarum Gottingensis editum VIII.5: Tobit [Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1983]). In my translations I have differed from the readings in Hanhart’s edition in only a few cases (an only in G  [see below]) and have adopted another reading on the basis of Greek manuscript evidence. See, for example, 1.2, where I omit Hanhart’s reading “road” (odou), because Codex Sinaiticus does not contain it. In 2.6, I retain “ways”(odoi/), the reading of Sinaiticus; Hanhart (following the  conjecture  of  Rahlfs  and  Fritzsche) adopts  the  reading  “songs” (wdai/)  and  refers  to  Amos  8.10.  In  6.11,  I  follow  MS  319,  a  reading  supported  also  in  4QpapTobitb,1  whose name is Sarra”; Hanhart omits “beautiful.” 

“he  has  a  beautiful (kalh/)  daughter 

DOWNLOAD THE NEW OXFORD UNIVERSITY TOBIT TEXT 

THE TWO GREEK VERSIONS 

Attestation 

    There are two complete versions of the book of Tobit in Greek. Robert Hanhart, the editor, calls these 
versions  Greek  I  (=  G  ),  the  shorter  text  form,  and  Greek  II  (=  G  ),  the  longer  form  (by  about  1700  words).  Almost  all  major  manuscripts – Vaticanus,  Alexandrinus,  Venetus,  Papyrus  Oxyrhynchus  15942 (= Ra[hlfs] 990) and most cursive manuscripts—contain G of Tobit, which Hanhart prints at the top of the page of his Göttingen edition with its apparatus underneath. 

  Unfortunately, G  is found relatively intact only in Codex Sinaiticus and partially (from 3.6 to the word tou/tou  in 6.16) in cursive manuscript 319, which, however, gives G from 1.1 to 3.5 and from 6.16 oti  to  14.15. Sinaiticus contains many copyist’s errors and has two significant lacunae (4.7–18 and 13.7–9). A tiny  portion of GII is preserved also in sixth-century Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 10763 (= Ra[hlfs] 910), containing 2.2–5, 
8. Hanhart prints G  at the bottom of the page with an apparatus, which includes readings from 319 and 910 as well as the critically important Old Latin manuscripts (= La). The Old Latin, which contains the entire book  of Tobit, is important, for it was translated from a text-form very close to the version found in Sinaiticus. 

    Priority 

    Curiously, in the introduction to his critical edition, Hanhart notes in passing that up to his day the ques- 
tion of the priority between G and G  could not be answered with certainty.  In his later study of the text  and textual history of Tobit, however, Hanhart is more nuanced; while noting that a case could be made for 
the priority of either G or G , he favors the judgment that G is a reworking of G .  Since earlier scholars  up to the nineteenth century preferred G to G , the King James Version (1611) and Revised Standard Version (1957) were translated from G . In the opinion of the vast majority of scholars today, however, G  with its highly Semitic coloring represents more accurately the original form of the book. In fact, the Cave IV fragmentary texts of Tobit from Qumran (four in Aramaic, 4QToba–d ar, and one in Hebrew, 4QTobe) “agree in general  with  the  long  version  of  the  book  found  in  the  fourth-century  Greek  text  of  Codex  Sinaiticus.”6 

Book of Tobit
Book of Tobit

Thus, the priority of GII seems beyond question. Accordingly, the most recent translations of Tobit are based 
on G : Jerusalem Bible (1966), New American Bible (1970), New English Bible (1970), Good News Bible, also known as Today’s English Version (1979), New Jerusalem Bible (1985), Revised English Bible (1989), 
New Revised Standard Version (1989), and the translation by Carey A. Moore in the Anchor Bible.  Oddly enough, however, despite the evidence of Qumran, Paul Deselaers  and Heinrich Gross  continue to defend the priority of G over G . 

    Internal evidence also favors G  as the basis of G ; see, for example, 2.3 where one would be hard put 
to imagine how the fourteen Greek words of G (“And he came and said, ‘Father, one of our race has been strangled  and  thrown  into  the  marketplace.’  ”)  could  possibly  have  been  the  source  of  the  thirty-nine 
Greek words found in G  (“So Tobias went to seek some poor person of our kindred. And on his return he said, ‘Father!’ And I said, ‘Here I am, my child.’ Then in reply he said, ‘Father, behold, one of our people has been murdered and thrown into the marketplace and now lies strangled there.’ ”). One can readily see how the translator of G has condensed the narrative and the dialogue between Tobias and Tobit. 

In contrast, G   provides the expected Semitic narrative framework as well as the back and forth dialogue of son and father. 

    A more dramatic example is 5.10 where G has only eight Greek words: “Then he called him, and he 
went in, and they greeted each other.” It is extremely unlikely that these eight words could have been the origin  of  the  149  words  in  G   in  which  in  detailed  (typically  biblical)  fashion  Tobit  tells  the  angel  Raphael (in disguise as a relative, Azarias) the anguish he experiences because of his blindness and the need  he  has  for  a  reliable  guide  to  accompany  his  son  Tobias  into  Media:  “Then  Tobias  went  out  and called  him  and  said  to  him,  ‘Young  man,  my  father  is  calling  you.’  So  he  went  in  to  him,  and  Tobith greeted  him  first.  And  he  said  to  him,  ‘Many  joyful  greetings  to  you!’  But  in  reply  Tobith  said  to  him, 

What is there for me still to be joyful about? Now I am a man with no power in my eyes, and I do not 
see the light of heaven, but I lie in darkness like the dead who no longer look at the light. Living, I am among the dead. I hear the voice of people, but I do not see them.’ So he said to him, ‘Take courage; the 
time is near for God to heal you; take courage.’ Then Tobith said to him, ‘Tobias my son wishes to go into Media. Can you go along with him and lead him? And I will give to you your wages, brother.’ And he said to him, ‘I can go with him; indeed, I know all the roads. Also I went into Media many times, and I crossed all its plains, and I know its mountains and all its roads.’ ” 

    A close examination of chapter 9 in G and G  provides further convincing evidence that the former 
is  condensed  from  the  latter.  The  text  of  G  ,  which  omits  many  narrative  elements,  fails  to  convey  the  drama and tension found in the much more detailed form of the story in G . 

    By reading the translations of G and G  synoptically, the reader will see many other instances where 
G  condenses G  or omits the G  repetitions that are a hallmark of biblical narrative. Perhaps the translator of G was writing for a more sophisticated Greek-speaking audience for whom the Semitic-type repetitions and extended dialogues could seem otiose or stylistically less elegant. 

A Third Version 

A third version exists in cursive manuscripts 106–107 (= d) that Hanhart calls Greek III (= G  ); it preserves the text of only 6.9–12.22. Hanhart describes GIII as a secondary text-form fundamentally related to G ;10  accordingly, he includes its variants in the apparatus of GII. It should be noted that 106–107 give the G form of the text from 1.1 to 6.8 and again from 13.1 to 14.15. 

APPROACH TO THE GREEK TEXT 
   

Synoptic Rendering 

    In accord with the general principles of NETS concerning books that have two Greek forms, I have rendered the exact synoptic parallels between the two versions of Tobit in the same way. These synoptic parallels within their contexts provide a further opportunity for the reader to see how G was indeed based upon G  and not the other way around. In any case, I hope that the reader will be able to follow more easily, with the aid of my translations, the two Greek forms of the book as we now have them. Since these Greek forms are themselves translations of a Semitic original, in my translations I have attempted to re- 
produce in English the flavor of these two Greek forms. 

    Recent Translations 

    The recent translations of the book of Tobit are based, as I mentioned above, on G , and these make 
a serious effort to reconstruct or correct the defective text of Sinaiticus on the basis of Greek witnesses, 
whenever possible, and also on the basis of the critically essential Old Latin witnesses. See, for example, 
the  critical  footnotes  the  translators  of  Tobit  supplied  in  the  New  Revised  Standard  Version,  and  especially the extensive critical notes I provided for my translation of Tobit in the New American Bible.11  The forthcoming revision of Tobit in the New American Bible, revised edition, by Joseph A. Fitzmyer who, as noted above, edited the Qumran fragments of Tobit, also will contain readings from these fragments. 

    The NETS Translations of Tobit 

    My translation of G , however, is different from any of these other translations. What I give is a trans- 
lation  of  G   alone,  warts  and  all.  In  those  places  where  Codex  Sinaiticus  has  lacunae,  as  noted  above,  

Hanhart does not supply a text, but only an apparatus. These lacunae, therefore, are represented also in 
my translation; to see what essentially would have been in these lacunae the reader should look to the translation  of  G  .  In  rare  cases  when  a  passage  of  G   is  awkward,  I  render  it  into  English  without  attempting to improve on the Greek. In 11.11–13, for instance, I give the following translation: “Then he lay the medicine on him, and  it worked . And he scaled it off with both his hands from the corners of his  eyes.”  Note    then  states:  “Gk  uncertain.”  Thus,  readers  can  see  for  themselves  what  the  Greek  text  says. I followed the same procedure in my translation of G . 

    If the translation of a Greek expression needs clarification, I have appended a note. The translation of  1.2 in G , for example, states, “Thisbe which is to the right  of Kydios . . . above Asser  to the west, leftc of Phogor.” My note a reads: “Aram/Heb = south,” and note c reads “Aram/Heb = north.” 

    The Names of the Protagonist(s) 

    In  the  Qumran  Aramaic  and  Hebrew  fragments  the  father’s  name  appears  as  ybw+,  a  Hebrew  name 
meaning “my good,” but this form is clearly an abbreviation of the son’s name hybw+, a Hebrew name meaning “Yah[weh] is my good,”12 which recurs also in Ezra 2.60; Neh 2.10, 19; 3.35; 4.1; 6.1, 12, 14, 17,  19;  7.62;  13.4,  7,  8.  The  father’s  name  in  the  Greek  forms  of  the  book  is  spelled  in  different  ways:  Twbi/t in G and Twbi/q (twenty-two times) in G ; the final consonant in each of these forms was added Twbi/j, is found eight times and is inflected: nominative (11.10; 12.4), dative Twbei/ (7.2) and accusative Twbi/n (3.17; 7.4; 9.6; 10.8; 11.18). The son’s name recurs as Twbi/aj in G as well as in G , a name that also can be inflected; this Greek name represents the transliteration of Hebrew hybw+. In the LXX of Ezra 2.60 and most of the Nehemiah texts, the name occurs as indeclinable Twbi/a. But in Neh 3.35; 6.12, 19, the name is given as Twbi/aj while in 6.17 the name occurs in the first of two instances in the accusative case. 

ALEXANDER A.  DI  LELLA 


1  See Joseph A. Fitzmyer, “Tobit,” in Qumran Cave 4 • XIV Parabiblical Texts Part 2 (Magen Broshi, et al., eds.; DJD 
   XIX; Oxford: Clarendon, 1995) 44, line 17. 

2  B. P. Grenfeld and A. S. Hunt, eds., The Oxyrhynchus Papyri: Part VIII (London: Egypt Exploration Society, 1911) 13.1–6. 

3  Ibid., 6–9. 

4  Hanhart, Tobit, 33. 

5  Robert Hanhart, Text und Textgeschichte des Buches Tobit (Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in 
   Göttingen, 3/139; MSU 17; Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1984) 21–37. 

6  Fitzmyer, “Tobit,” 2. Fitzmyer (“The Aramaic and Hebrew Fragments of Tobit from Qumran Cave 4,” CBQ 57 [1995] 
   675) writes that the Qumran fragments preserve “perhaps not more than a fifth of the original Semitic texts,” and    then he adds that “there is little in [these fragments] that is radically new, or different from the form of the story in 
   either [Sinaiticus] or the VL.” He dates (Ibid., 655–657) the copies of these fragments from roughly 100 BCE to CE 50. 

7  Carey A. Moore, Tobit: A New Translation and Commentary (AB 40A; New York: Doubleday, 1996). 

8  Paul Deselaers, Das Buch Tobit: Studien zu seiner Entstehung, Komposition und Theologie (OBO 43; Freiburg: 
   Universitätsverlag, 1982). See the critical review of Deselaers by Irene Nowell, CBQ 46 (1984) 306–307. 

9  Heinrich Gross, Tobit. Judith (Die Neue Echter Bibel: Kommentar zum Alten Testament mit der Einheitsübersetzung 
   19; Würzburg: Echter Verlag, 1987). 

10   Hanhart, Tobit, 33. 


Originally posted 2020-01-10 08:24:17.